Thursday, July 30, 2009

Al Roker's Book Club preempts Word of the Week Thursday

In breaking news... (really! this is taken from today's press release!)

NBC’s TODAY SHOW SELECTS NEWBERY HONOR WINNER SAVVY FOR NEXT AL ROKER BOOK CLUB


New York, NY…July 30, 2009 – NBC’s Today show announced this morning that Ingrid Law’s Newbery Honor winner and New York Times bestseller SAVVY will be Al Roker’s next Book Club Pick this fall. The TV host and young fans will have a chance to interview the author in the studio during a live show at the end of August. SAVVY was published under the joint venture between Dial Books for Young Readers, a division of Penguin Young Readers Group, and Walden Media and will soon be a major motion picture from Walden Media.

Al’s Book Club for Kids has become synonymous with outstanding children’s literature. The club began in 2007 as a way to get kids to keep reading and not experience the “summer slide”. Roker chooses books for kids between the ages of 9-11 and then gives them the opportunity to discuss what they are reading. Past selections have included The Golden Compass, Diary of a Wimpy Kid, and The Tale of Despereaux, in addition to other acclaimed titles.

Some fun! I'm so honored that they chose SAVVY and thrilled to get the opportunity to share more about the book with the kids on the show and all across the country.

So, what's a good, unusual word for fun or happy? Oh, I've got one, no Word of the Week preempt necessary.

Today, I feel downright...

ABDERIAN

"abderian" (AB-dir-ee-uhn) is an adjective meaning: prone to laughing a lot. According to Anu Garg at wordsmith.org, the word is from the place name Abdera, a town in ancient Thrace, which is present day Bulgaria, Turkey, and Greece. Abdera was the birth place of a man named Democritus, also known as the Laughing Philosopher.

On his word site, Anu Garg says that it is not certain why this fellow, Democritus, was called the Laughing Philosopher. He has some theories though, and Democritus often appeared laughing in painted portraits.

Just as a fun side note: What is the opposite of an abderian person called? What is the word for someone who never laughs? According to Anu Garg, the best word choice here would be:

AGELAST

(AJ-uh-last)

So, that's the big news about the Today Show and Al Roker's Book Club (Al Roker is definitely NOT an AGELAST). You can check out the announcement, as well as past Book Club selections--and even watch the video links--by clicking on the link below:

http://today.msnbc.msn.com/id/18179145/

Monday, July 27, 2009

Reader Monday - What's Your Savvy?


For more reader savvies, click on the What's your savvy? label here on the blog. And check back weekly for Reader Savvy Mondays, where I post what real kids have to say about what their savvy know-how might be. Or to write to me what you imagine your savvy might be, click HERE to be directed to the Contact page of my website.

Saturday, July 25, 2009

Thursday, July 23, 2009

Word of the Week Thursday

This week's word of the week comes from the advanced reading copy of Richard Peck's A Season of Gifts (9/09).

GLOAMING

"Now Mrs. Dowdel, gray in the gloaming, loomed out from around her cobhouse."

'Gloaming' means dusk or twilight.

Monday, July 20, 2009

Reader Monday - What's Your Savvy?


For more reader savvies, click on the What's your savvy? label here on the blog. And check back weekly for Reader Savvy Mondays, where I post what real kids have to say about what their savvy know-how might be. Or to write to me what you imagine your savvy might be, click HERE to be directed to the Contact page of my website.

Saturday, July 18, 2009

Thursday, July 16, 2009

Word of the Week Thursday

This week's word comes from Kate DiCamillo's new book, The Magician's Elephant.

FILLIP

As one character remembers watching a dog run and leap into the air:

"He remembered how, in mid-leap, she would always twist her body, a small unnecessary gesture, a fillip of joy, to show that this impossible thing was easy for her."

Pronounced like the name, Phillip, 'fillip' can be defined: a tap or snap of the fingers, or, in the case of the sentence above, something that rouses or excites.

Monday, July 13, 2009

Some quick pictures from ALA

I've just arrived home and am too tired to do much more than post a few pictures from the weekend. I didn't get very many with my own camera, but I know that family and friends will be sharing more photos with me soon. Hopefully, I'll be able to post more soon. But for now...

Here's fellow honoree, Jackie Woodson; Newbery Committee Chair, Rose Trevino; and me at the Penguin cocktail party Friday night. We attended this party for the Newbery Committee and select librarians with seven other marvelous authors and illustrators, including Richard Peck, John Green, Gennifer Choldenko, Jerry Pickney, Loren Long, Sarah Dessen... and... oh no. I know I'm missing people...


After the party, Jackie and I got to spend a wonderful evening at a private dinner with the members of the committee and the staff from Penguin. It was so great to have my editor, Alisha Niehaus, there by my side all weekend. We had so much fun!

Below, here's a picture of me at my first signing (I had five!). I wore my new glasses... still not sure about them...


One of the highlights of the weekend was meeting and spending a little time with the brilliant Richard Peck. We shared a signing table together at The Magic Tree Bookstore's 25th anniversary party.


At the VIP reception prior to the Newbery banquet, the picture below is of (from left to right) my agent, Dan Lazar, me, my editor, Alisha Niehaus, and my publisher, Lauri Hornik! It was a great night! (More pictures to come!) We really didn't arrange ahead of time for our outfits to match so well.


Below, me and fellow Honor recipient, Kathi Appelt.


A very dark and blurry shot of Neil Gaiman mid-speech at the banquet. Can you see the giant screen with his image in the background? There were two of those.


And finally, the last pics for tonight: the views from my hotel room at Swissotel. Chicago was beautiful!!




Reader Monday - What's Your Savvy?


For more reader savvies, click on the What's your savvy? label here on the blog. And check back weekly for Reader Savvy Mondays, where I post what real kids have to say about what their savvy know-how might be. Or to write to me what you imagine your savvy might be, click HERE to be directed to the Contact page of my website.

Saturday, July 11, 2009

Classroom Doors #6

More from Dieringer Heights Elementary! (I think this was one of the Kindergarten doors)

Thursday, July 9, 2009

Word(s) of the Week Thursday

This week's words are:

QUIDNUNCKERY

or

QUIDNUNC



"Quidnunckery" is defined as: curiosity, nosiness,
or love of gossip, or news.
It's far more likely you'll find "quidnunc" in the dictionary.
A "quidnunc" is a person who always wants to know
the latest news, a busybody, or a nosy person.


(from L. quid nunc, what now) "gossip-monger," 1709,
formed from L. quid "what" and nunc "now,"
to describe someone forever asking "What's the news?"*

*etymology from Dictionary.com,
go to http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/quidnunc for full sources.

Wednesday, July 8, 2009

A Quote

My recent lack of thoughtful posts, beyond my usual favorite pictures from readers or weekly vocabulary words, is entirely due to the intensity of my writing schedule... though I may have something fun to post after ALA and the Newbery banquet this coming weekend! I intend to bring my camera. Whether or not I'll get around to using it is another matter altogether.

But today I do have a quote to share. One which, from where I am now in my writing process, is much appreciated by me.

"Books aren't written - they're rewritten. Including your own. It is one of the hardest things to accept, especially after the seventh rewrite hasn't quite done it. - Michael Crichton

Monday, July 6, 2009

Word-Nerd Excitement!

I heard the best segment on BBC radio tonight about a new thesaurus--forty years in the making--that will be published this coming October. I wish I could find a link to the audio from the program as it was longer and more detailed than the blurb I found online. But here is the link to BBC online:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/england/oxfordshire/8136122.stm

I've been trying to imagine what it must have been like for Professor Christian Kay, now 69, and one of four co-editors. Professor Kay began working on this book in the late 1960s--when she was 27! Imagine spending so many years collecting words!

This book and the DARE Dictionary (the Dictionary of American Regional English - a book that shows where people use the words that are included) are both on my list of must-have books.

Reader Monday - What's Your Savvy?


For more reader savvies, click on the What's your savvy? label here on the blog. And check back weekly for Reader Savvy Mondays, where I post what real kids have to say about what their savvy know-how might be. Or to write to me what you imagine your savvy might be, click HERE to be directed to the Contact page of my website.

Saturday, July 4, 2009

Thursday, July 2, 2009

Word of the Week Thursday

Okay, admittedly, there is some debate online about the word I'm putting up this week, but I'm going to post it anyway because I like it as well as its reported (or purported) meaning... so this week's word is:

SCHLIMMBESSERUNG

From German (Verschlimmbesserung? I'm not a German speaker, so for more insights into the word, try Googling it), meaning: "making something worse through an attempt to make things better." How often do we do this? I like knowing there's a word for such a moment.